New York Daily News Gives The Middle Finger To Ted Cruz On Its Front Page

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The New York Daily News wants to make sure Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz meets the city’s official bird.

Cruz on Tuesday dismissively referred to Donald Trump’s “New York values,” a phrase that provoked a response from many of the city’s residents on both sides of the aisle.

And on Friday, “New York’s Hometown Newspaper” used an image of Lady Liberty giving the finger to Cruz on its front page, and urged him to “go back to Canada,” where he was born.

“DROP DEAD, TED,” the page reads.

During Thursday night’s Republican debate, Trump gave a definition for “New York values” that even Cruz was forced to applaud.

“When the World Trade Center came down, I saw something that no place on Earth could have handled more beautifully, more humanely than New York,” Trump said.

The city’s other tabloid, the New York Post, also confronted Cruz on his “New York values” dig.

“That line aimed to get Iowa voters to contrast him with Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton,” the paper’s editorial board wrote. “But it rings pretty odd once you know of his history with at least two big New York banks.”

The Post was referring to Cruz’s previously undisclosed $1 million in loans from Goldman Sachs and Citibank.

 

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Paul Ryan says Obama’s State of the Union ‘degrades the presidency’

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In his final State of the Union address, President Obama laid out a vision of America seriously at odds with the vision of hate and exclusion the Republican presidential candidates have been pushing. It was hard to miss what Obama was talking about when he said things like, “we need to reject any politics that targets people because of race or religion.” Well, obviously Republicans cannot allow themselves to agree with anything the president says. In fact, it always has to be BAD BAD BAD, no matter what.

And so it is: House Speaker Paul Ryan agrees with Obama that Donald Trump’s proposal to ban Muslims from entering the country is a bad idea. But if Ryan agrees with the president on substance, he has to disagree on style, because heaven knows he can’t be seen just plain agreeing with Obama on anything. So …

“But I think it sort of degrades the presidency to then talk about primary politics in the other party, during primaries. That’s not what presidents ought to be talking about in State of the Union addresses,” Ryan added. “Speaking up for our values and speaking up for our beliefs is one thing. But kind of wading into the primary politics of the other party is just not really what presidents ought to do.”

Let’s recast just a bit. Ryan is saying it “degrades the presidency” for the president to speak out against bigotry when bigotry is in the news. He’s saying the president must keep quiet about one of the major political debates of our time just because it’s being driven by presidential primary candidates. It’s not good enough that Obama didn’t name names, just said we shouldn’t target people because of race or religion and that throughout American history, “there have been those who told us to fear the future; who claimed we could slam the brakes on change, promising to restore past glory if we just got some group or idea that was threatening America under control,” but that “each time, we overcame those fears.” This is degrading the presidency by wading into the primary politics of the other party? Pfft.

And seriously. Republicans have been saying Obama has been degrading the presidency since the day he took office, if not before. Remember how, in the first month of Obama’s presidency, former George W. Bush chief of staff Andrew Card got up on a soapbox about how Obama needed to wear a jacket in the Oval Office at all times, including weekends, because “I think it’s appropriate to have an expectation that there will be a dress code that respects the office of the President”? Except it turned out that Card’s own boss had gone jacket-less in the Oval Office, as had John F. Kennedy, Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, and Bill Clinton. What could it possibly be about Obama that moves Republicans straight past “I would do things differently, myself” to “degrading the presidency” or failing to “respect the office of the president” adequately?

Hmm, what could it possibly be?

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WASHINGTON — In a scathing response to President Obama’s State of the Union Address, House Speaker Paul Ryan told USA TODAY on Wednesday that the speech’s political tone toward Donald Trump and the Republican presidential field “degrades the presidency.”

Obama made comments unmistakably targeted at Trump, though he didn’t mention the GOP front-runner by name in Tuesday’s address. The president blasted as un-American and wrong-headed those who are “promising to restore past glory if we just got some group or idea that was threatening America under control.”

Ryan said he agreed with Obama that Trump’s proposal to temporarily ban Muslim immigrants from the United States was a bad idea. “Putting a religious test on anybody coming to this country is wrong,” the Wisconsin Republican said. “We ought to have a security test, not a religious test. That’s who we are.

“But I think it sort of degrades the presidency to then talk about primary politics in the other party, during primaries. That’s not what presidents ought to be talking about in State of the Union addresses,” Ryan added. “Speaking up for our values and speaking up for our beliefs is one thing. But kind of wading into the primary politics of the other party is just not really what presidents ought to do.”

Ryan sat down with Capital Download in the same gilded ceremonial room where congressional leaders had greeted Obama on Tuesday before he went into the House chamber to deliver his final State of the Union before a joint session of Congress, members of his Cabinet, justices of the Supreme Court and foreign ambassadors.

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The speaker was trailed by his three children — 13-year-old Liza, 12-year-old Charles and 11-year-old Sam — visiting from the family’s home in Janesville, Wis., and waiting patiently for him to finish so they could have lunch together in the Members Dining Room.

The State of the Union had been the first such official ritual since Ryan, 45, succeeded John Boehner as House speaker two months ago — a job he hadn’t sought and wasn’t sure he wanted. Indeed, the task of sitting just behind the president, keeping a poker face for an hour, was tough, he said: “I just basically wanted to be wallpaper.”

But the next day, Ryan’s blunt comments about Obama’s message reflected a deep political divide about the state of the nation and its future.

Asked for a response, White House spokesman Eric Schultz said Obama had been struck by “the tone of the political debate and the doom and gloom that some are peddling. The president wanted to address that head-on because he has never been more optimistic about the future of this country and the potential of the American people.” He noted that the speech also included priorities the White House wants to pursue with Congress this year.

“I thought it was a fairly typical speech for the president,” Ryan said. “Apparently ISIS is a bunch of guys riding around in trucks and a picture of a good foreign policy is Syria. I think he glossed over the economy. I think he glossed over our foreign-policy failures.” Later he said, “That’s the kind of speech he gives these days, and I think it really is divorced from reality.”

He said Obama’s arguments defending his record — and dismissing as “political hot air” accusations that the nation is in economic and military decline — didn’t square with the realities many Americans see in their own lives. “What I don’t think you got out of that speech is, people are really hurting,” he said.

“I think people are really nervous. I think people are really anxious. And that’s because they believe that the country as they know it, this American idea — the condition of your birth doesn’t determine the outcome of your life  … so many people are worried that’s leaving us.

“People are going to say, I want someone who understands the pain I feel and the anxiety I have and the fear I have that the country is going to lose a piece of its greatness,” Ryan said. “I think that’s more than a Republican thing. I think Democrats feel it the same way.”

Ryan, who will be chairman of the Republican National Convention this summer, said “of course” he would support Trump if he wins the GOP nomination. “I respect the primary process,” he said. “I respect the Republican primary voter.”

He also defended South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley, castigated by some conservative commentators for remarks she made in the official Republican response to the State of the Union. Haley, the daughter of immigrants from India, had urged Americans to resist “the siren call of the angriest voices.” In an interview on NBC’s Today show Wednesday, she acknowledged that Trump was one of those she had in mind.

“I think she’s made her point pretty well, which is as conservatives we’ve got great principles, great ideas, and these are inspirational,” he said. “These are optimistic ideas. These are inclusive ideas. And that means that we have a conservative set of philosophies and principles that give us policies that actually should be inclusive and appealing to people, and I believe what Nikki Haley did was go out and win converts to conservatism.”

Why I Will Never Vote for Donald Trump

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Beginning with Ronald Reagan, I have voted Republican in every presidential election since I first became eligible to vote in 1980. I worked in the Reagan and George H. W. Bush administrations and in the White House for George W. Bush as a speechwriter and adviser. I have also worked for Republican presidential campaigns, although not this time around.

Despite this history, and in important ways because of it, I will not vote for Donald Trump if he wins the Republican nomination.During the course of this campaign he has repeatedly revealed his ignorance on basic matters of national interest — the three ways the United States is capable of firing nuclear weapons (by land, sea and air), the difference between the Quds Force in Iran and the Kurds to their west, North Korea’s nuclear tests, the causes of autism, the effects of his tax plan on the deficit and much besides.

Mr. Trump has no desire to acquaint himself with most issues, let alone master them. He has admitted that he doesn’t prepare for debates or study briefing books; he believes such things get in the way of a good performance. No major presidential candidate has ever been quite as disdainful of knowledge, as indifferent to facts, as untroubled by his benightedness.

It is little surprise, then, that many of Mr. Trump’s most celebrated pronouncements and promises — to quickly and “humanely” expel 11 million illegal immigrants, to force Mexico to pay for the wall he will build on our southern border, to defeat the Islamic State “very quickly” while as a bonus taking its oil, to bar Muslims from immigrating to the United States — are nativistic pipe dreams and public relations stunts.

Even more disqualifying is Mr. Trump’s temperament. He is erratic, inconsistent and unprincipled. He possesses a streak of crudity and cruelty that manifested itself in how he physically mocked a Times journalist with a disability, ridiculed Senator John McCain for being a P.O.W., made a reference to “blood” intended to degrade a female journalist and compared one of his opponents to a child molester.

Mr. Trump’s legendary narcissism would be comical were it not dangerous in someone seeking the nation’s highest office — as he demonstrated when he showered praise on the brutal, anti-American president of Russia, Vladimir V. Putin, responding to Mr. Putin’s expression of admiration for Mr. Trump.

“It is always a great honor,” Mr. Trump said last month, “to be so nicely complimented by a man so highly respected within his own country and beyond.”

Mr. Trump’s virulent combination of ignorance, emotional instability, demagogy, solipsism and vindictiveness would do more than result in a failed presidency; it could very well lead to national catastrophe. The prospect of Donald Trump as commander in chief should send a chill down the spine of every American.

For Republicans, there is an additional reason not to vote for Mr. Trump. His nomination would pose a profound threat to the Republican Party and conservatism, in ways that Hillary Clinton never could. For while Mrs. Clinton could inflict a defeat on the Republican Party, she could not redefine it. But Mr. Trump, if he were the Republican nominee, would.

Mr. Trump’s presence in the 2016 race has already had pernicious effects, but they’re nothing compared with what would happen if he were the Republican standard-bearer. The nominee, after all, is the leader of the party; he gives it shape and definition. If Mr. Trump heads the Republican Party, it will no longer be a conservative party; it will be an angry, bigoted, populist one. Mr. Trump would represent a dramatic break with and a fundamental assault on the party’s best traditions.

The Republican Party’s best traditions, of course, have not always been evident. (The same is true of the Democratic Party, by the way.) Over the years we have seen antecedents of today’s Trumpism both on issues and in style — for example, in Pat Buchanan’s presidential campaigns in the 1990s, in Sarah Palin’s rise in the party, in the reckless rhetoric of some on the right like Ann Coulter.

The sentiments animating these individuals have had influence in the party, and in recent years growing influence. But they have not been dominant and they have certainly never been in control. Mr. Trump’s securing the Republican nomination would change all that. Whatever problems one might be tempted to lay at the feet of the Republican Party, Donald Trump is in a different and more destructive category.

In these pages in July 1980, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, the Democratic senator from New York, declared, “Of a sudden, the G.O.P. has become a party of ideas.” If Mr. Trump wins the nomination, the G.O.P. will become the party of anti-reason.

I will go further: Mr. Trump is precisely the kind of man our system of government was designed to avoid, the type of leader our founders feared — a demagogic figure who does not view himself as part of our constitutional system but rather as an alternative to it.

I understand that it often happens that those of us in politics don’t get the nominee we want, yet we nevertheless unify behind the candidate who wins our party’s nomination. If those who don’t get their way pick up their marbles and go home, party politics doesn’t work. That has always been my view, until now. Donald Trump has altered the political equation because he has altered the moral equation. For this lifelong Republican, at least, he is beyond the pale. Party loyalty has limits.

No votes have yet been cast, primary elections are fluid, and sobriety often prevails, so Mr. Trump is hardly the inevitable Republican nominee. But, stunningly, that is now something that is quite conceivable. If this scenario comes to pass, many Republicans will find themselves in a situation they once thought unimaginable: refusing to support the nominee of their party because it is the best thing that they can do for their party and their country.

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Gov. Nikki Haley: ‘We’ve never in the history of this country passed any laws’ based on race. Jim Crow?

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South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley continues to defend her (gentle) criticism of Donald Trump in her State of the Union response, saying that Trump’s demands to “ban all Muslims” were “the one thing that got me.”

After all, she says:

“When you’ve got immigrants who are coming here legally, we’ve never in the history of this country passed any laws or done anything based on race or religion. Let’s not start that now,” she said while speaking to reporters in South Carolina.

Nikki Haley is the current Republican governor of South Carolina, an American state.

Discuss.

 

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WATCH: NO TRUMP, AMERICA’S PAST WAS NOT GREAT; IT WAS INTENTIONALLY RACIST.

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Never undermine the sacrifice That was paid for equality

Never undermine the sacrifice That was paid for equality

Posted by Troy Davis Muhammad on Wednesday, February 19, 2014

Don’t let Trump fool you: rightwing populism is the new normal

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madeIt might be tempting to view the political success of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump as something uniquely American. But, argues Gary Younge, rightwing populism and scapegoating of society’s vulnerable is cropping up all across the west. This is what happens when big business has more power than governments.

Don't let Trump fool you: rightwing populism is the new normal

It might be tempting to view the political success of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump as something uniquely American. But, argues Gary Younge, rightwing populism and scapegoating of society’s vulnerable is cropping up all across the west. This is what happens when big business has more power than governments

Posted by The Guardian on Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Silently protesting Muslim woman ejected from Trump rally

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Rock Hill, South Carolina – A Muslim woman wearing a hijab was escorted out of Donald Trump’s campaign event on Friday by police after she stood up in silent protest during Trump’s speech.

Rose Hamid, a 56-year-old flight attendant sitting in the stands directly behind Trump, stood up Friday during Trump’s speech when the Republican front-runner suggested that Syrian refugees fleeing war in Syria were affiliated with ISIS.

Despite her silence, Trump supporters around her began chanting Trump’s name — as instructed by Trump campaign staff before the event in case of protests — and pointed at Hamid and Marty Rosenbluth, the man alongside her who stood up as well.

As they were escorted out, Trump supporters roared — booing the pair and shouting at them to “get out.” One person shouted, “You have a bomb, you have a bomb,” according to Hamid.

“The ugliness really came out fast and that’s really scary,” Hamid told CNN in a phone interview after she was ejected.

Major Steven Thompson of the Rock Hill Police Department told CNN Hamid was kicked out of the event because the campaign told him beforehand that “anybody who made any kind of disturbance” should be escorted out.

The Trump campaign did not immediately respond to a request for comment asking why Hamid was escorted out of the venue.

After Hamid and three others, all wearing stars reminiscent of those worn by Jews during the Holocaust, were escorted out by police and Trump campaign officials, Trump commented on the disturbance.

“There is hatred against us that is unbelievable,” Trump said. “It’s their hatred, it’s not our hatred.”

Before the event, Hamid told CNN that she didn’t plan to shout or disrupt the event — she simply wanted to give Trump supporters a glimpse of what Muslims are like.

“I figured that most Trump supporters probably never met a Muslim so I figured that I’d give them the opportunity to meet one,” she said, wearing a shirt that read “Salam, I come in peace.” “I really don’t plan to say anything. I don’t want to be disrespectful but if he says something that I feel needs answering I might — we’ll just see what strikes me.”

Hamid joined a group of people — some friends, others strangers — who wanted to silently protest Trump’s Islamophobic proposals.

Several of those other people attended Trump’s rally in Aiken, South Carolina, last month, including Jibril Hough.

Unlike Hamid, Hough did not stay silent, shouting “Islam is not the problem” as Trump spoke about radical Islamic extemism.

Despite her early exit, Hamid did manage to speak with the Trump supporters sitting around her in the stands, several of whom held her hand and said “sorry” as she was forced to leave the venue.

“The people around me who I had an opportunity to talk with were very sweet,” she said. “The people I did not make contact with, the people who Trump influenced were really nasty.”

One woman Hamid spoke with in line remarked that she “didn’t look scary,” but “like a good one.”

“People don’t have a chance to see anything other than the Muslims they see on TV,” Hamid said, pointing to footage of terrorists and Islamist militants.

Hamid said before the event that she was not concerned for her safety, explaining her ardent belief that “people are mostly decent.”

After her chaotic exit, Hamid remained optimistic about the character of most people — even those who shouted at her to “get out” — instead blaming Trump’s heated rhetoric and outsized influence.

“This demonstrates how when you start dehumanizing the other it can turn people into very hateful, ugly people,” she said. “It needs to be known.”

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Muslim woman kicked out of Donald Trump rally after silent pro...

Wearing yellow stars resembling the patch forced on Jews during the Holocaust, a Muslim man and woman are removed from a Donald Trump rally in South Carolina. abc7.la/1MYrb2XThe couple is escorted out after standing in silent protest as Trump suggests refugees fleeing war in Syria are ISIS affiliated.

Posted by ABC7 on Friday, January 8, 2016
Muslim woman kicked out of Trump rally speaks to CNN.mp4

A Muslim woman was kicked out of a Donald J. Trump rally Friday. "My goal was to let people see that Muslims are not that scary. And the people around me were lovely," she sals. But then "the crowd got this hateful crowd-mentality when I was getting escorted (out)." http://cnn.it/1ZTNqjJ

Posted by CNN on Saturday, January 9, 2016

Megyn Kelly details Donald Trump’s stalker-like obsession, sent gifts

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Donald Trump has singled out many people during his campaign, but none have remained a target in Trump’s eyes and Twitter feed quite like Fox News anchor Megyn Kelly.

Trump’s issue with Kelly exploded after the first Republican debate, when Kelly understandably called Trump out on his long-winded history of sexist, misogynistic comments toward women. Trump, being the abrasive a**hole that he is, blew the incident way out of proportion and continued to slam Kelly both on and off Twitter for weeks after the debate. Now Kelly is speaking out against Trump, claiming that the business mogul had actually tried to “woo” her in some incredibly creepy ways – which may have influenced why he was so bitter when she called him out.

This month Kelly graces the cover of Vanity Fair magazine, in which the 45-year-old journalist spoke about her interactions with The Donald at length. Kelly said that Trump used to send her press clippings that were signed “Donald Trump”, and called her numerous times to tell her how much he enjoyed certain segments of her show (ironically, after the debate Trump criticized Kelly’s show extensively). Kelly didn’t think much of this at first, but when Trump announced he was going to run for president, Kelly said “it became more clear.”

2FCA22CF00000578-3383816-Megyn_Kelly_says_Donald_Trump_tried_to_woo_her_before_he_announc-a-51_1451916854073But, Kelly said that Trump’s efforts were completely futile. She said:

“I can’t be wooed. I was never going to love him, and I was never going to hate him.”

Kelly also opened up about Trump’s bitter exchange with her at the first GOP debate. Revealing that she had actually been quite ill the morning of the debate, the married mother-of-three said she had a blanket and a bucket to throw up in under her desk during the debate. She was worried that if she’d called in sick, the tough questions she prepared for the candidates wouldn’t have been asked.

“I would have crawled over a pile of hot coals to make it to that debate. No one was going to be sitting in for me, reading my questions. And I can say with confidence that neither Bret nor Chris wanted to read my questions – for many reasons!”

Kelly revealed that her decision to focus on Trump’s sexist remarks was because she knew Democratic frontrunner Hillary Clinton would zero in on them if they faced each other in the general election. Part of what Kelly said to Trump was:

“Your Twitter account has several disparaging comments about womens’ looks. You once told a contestant on celebrity apprentice that it would be a pretty picture to see her on her knees.

Does that sound to you like the temperament of a man we should elect as president? And how will you answer the charge from Hillary Clinton – who is likely to be the Democratic nominee – that you are a part of the war on women?”

It was one of the most reported moments from the debate, and Kelly received attacks from both Trump AND his loyal followers for holding him accountable. Trump lovers sent her death threats, called her a “c–t” and a “hag” on social media – even Trump’s top deputy retweeted “gut her.” Trump was especially immature about the situation, and he took his disdain for being confronted to new heights when he told CNN’s Don Lemon that Kelly had “blood coming out of her eyes. Blood coming out of her – wherever.” Then, the Republican frontrunner threatened to boycott Fox and continued to diss Kelly for weeks after the debate – only further proving her point about Trump’s misogyny.

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Crazy Trump Spokesperson with Bullet Necklace Turns Out to be Unemployment Cheat & Shoplifter

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Oh this is good stuff. You may have seen Jen Hayden’s post yesterday about Katrina Pierson, the Trump national spokesperson who wore a bullet necklace, said next time she would wear a fetus, and, regarding Trump’s plan to ban all Muslims, said something like, “Who cares? They’re Muslim.” Well, she seems nice. From Addicting Info:

Katrina Pierson, the national spokeswoman for Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, collected at least $11,000 in unemployment benefits while she was still working.

Pierson received these benefits from the Texas Workforce Commission between January 2012 and November 2013. At the same time she received this government money, Pierson was working as a consultant for Ted Cruz’s campaign for the U.S. Senate.

Receiving unemployment benefits while she was still working would seem to go against the grain of the message being pushed by Trump and the Republican Party, who have often been quick to blame minorities and immigrants for being on the government dole, supposedly taking up resources that should be going to white Americans (in reality, whites are the most likely to receive welfare benefits).

The spokeswoman, who recently made news in a CNN appearance where she wore a necklace made out of bullets and promised to wear one stylized like fetuses after gun violence prevention advocates called her out, also had an arrest for shoplifting. She stole clothing from a JC Penney store in Plano, Texas. She had her child with her.

SOURCE

GREED: Trump helped draft will that excluded his brother’s children: report

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The Trump siblings — from left, Robert, Elizabeth, Freddy, Donald and Maryanne — in an undated photo. Freddy Trump, who died in 1981, was eight years older than Donald. VIA DONALD TRUMP CAMPAIGN

For Donald Trump, Lessons From a Brother’s Suffering

By JASON HOROWITZ

Things went bad fast.

As Freddy, a fun-loving airline pilot with a gift for imitating W. C. Fields, joked with his best friend at the table, his younger brother grew impatient. Grow up, get serious and make something of yourself in the family business, Donald scolded.

“Donald put Freddy down quite a bit,” said Annamaria Schifano, then the girlfriend of Freddy’s best friend, who was at the dinner and recalled Donald’s tendency to pick fights and storm out. “There was a lot of combustion.”

Freddy Trump circa 1965. He would die at age 43. “I watched him,” his brother Donald said. “And I learned from him.” VIA ANNAMARIA SCHIFANO

For Mr. Trump, a presidential candidate whose appeal is predicated on an aura of toughness, personal achievement and perpetual success, the story of Freddy, a handsome, gregarious and self-destructive figure who died as an alcoholic in 1981 at the age of 43, is bleak and seldom told.

In a telephone interview last week, Mr. Trump said he had learned by watching his brother how bad choices could drag down even those who seemed destined to rise. Seeing his brother suffering led him to avoid ever trying alcohol or cigarettes, he said.

But the painful case of Freddy Trump, eight years his brother’s senior and once the heir apparent to their father’s real estate empire, also serves as an example of the dangers of failing to conform in a family dominated by a driven, perfectionist patriarch and an aggressive younger brother. In the upwardly mobile Trump family, Donald was the second and favorite son, the one who got into the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, relished the combat of New York real estate and ultimately made the Trump name an international brand. Freddy was the disappointment, who lacked the killer instinct and drifted so far from his father’s ambitions that his children were largely cut out of the patriarch’s will.

Freddy, as he was known, “was caught sort of in the middle as somebody who didn’t really love it, and only because he didn’t really love it, he wasn’t particularly good at it,” Mr. Trump said. “My father had great confidence in me, which maybe even put pressure on Fred.”

Asked whether Freddy’s experience in the family business, which friends described as miserable, contributed to the drinking that ultimately killed him, Mr. Trump said: “I hope not. I hope not.”

From the beginning, Freddy stood out as different from his authoritarian, workaholic father. As Fred Sr. became one of the master builders of the New York boroughs, his mischievous son drank Cokes, and eventually beers, with friends in the family recreation room. Less quick-witted than his older sister, Maryanne Trump Barry, now a federal judge, he was also more welcoming of outsiders than his father.

When Ms. Schifano moved to Jamaica Estates, Queens, the wealthy enclave where the Trumps lived, Freddy confided to her that his parents had panicked because, as Italians, the Schifanos were “the first ethnic family to move into the neighborhood.” But Freddy was less concerned with ethnic distinctions. When he enrolled at Lehigh University in Pennsylvania, the boy with blond hair who had attended an Episcopalian boys’ preparatory school on Long Island joined a Jewish fraternity.

“It may have been Freddy’s first attempt to make his own statement to his father,” said his best friend at Lehigh, Bruce Turry, who, like several other former fraternity brothers, remembered Freddy claiming that his father, the son of German immigrants, was Jewish. (He was not.) “Freddy was a classic illustration of someone who had a father complex.”

The Jewish fraternity brothers kidded Freddy about his middle name, Christ. He found the ribbing, like much else in life, hysterical.

In his junior year, he and Mr. Turry called themselves the “mysterious two” and went through the fraternity house short-sheeting beds. But Freddy was also generous to his fraternity brothers.

He gave Mr. Turry, who was saving to buy his girlfriend an engagement ring, a stock tip and left notes for him about his improving investment. “Your eighth of a carat is up to a quarter-carat,” he wrote.

It eventually became apparent to his fraternity brothers that Freddy, who wore Brooks Brothers clothes that draped his thin frame, was wealthy. He drove a Corvette and owned a Century speedboat. Sometimes he would take his little brother Donald, then a student at an upstate military academy, onboard for summer fishing expeditions off Long Island.

“I hope you don’t mind, I have to take my pain-in-the-ass brother Donald along,” another fraternity brother, Stuart Oltchick, recalled him saying.

At the time, Donald looked up to his brother and kept a photograph of him, standing next to an airplane, in his dorm room at military school. But he also looked toward a future without him in the way. According to “The Trumps: Three Generations That Built an Empire,” by Gwenda Blair, Donald told his roommate that Freddy’s decision to be a pilot rather than run the family business had cleared a path for him to succeed his father.

Freddy developed his passion for aviation at Lehigh’s flying club, where he flew under electrical lines and raced storms home. But as his 1960 graduation neared, his father began building Trump Village, an enormous development on Coney Island and the first to bear the family name. Freddy was eager to make his mark.

“He was going to make the Trump name known,” as his father dreamed, Mr. Turry said. “We were going to live in one of his father’s apartments and have a ringside seat at the Copacabana.”

It didn’t work out. While working on Trump Village, Freddy was berated by his father for installing expensive new windows instead of repairing old ones. Mr. Trump said that their father “could be unyielding,” and that Freddy had struggled with his abundant criticism and stinginess with praise.

“For me, it worked very well,” Mr. Trump said. “For Fred, it wasn’t something that was going to work.”

Mr. Oltchick said Freddy had “complained that he didn’t get his appreciation.”

As Freddy stumbled, Mr. Trump said, “I watched him. And I learned from him.”

Freddy left real estate to pursue his passion for flying, working for Trans World Airlines, which gave him some good years. In 1962, at age 23, he married Linda Clapp, a stewardess. They had two children, whom they named Fred and Mary, after Freddy’s parents. The family settled in Queens and spent free time with Freddy’s childhood best friend, William Drake, also a pilot, and his wife, Ms. Schifano.

The couples went deep-sea fishing and ate clams on the half shell. Once, when they spotted a Soviet trawler in international waters off the coast of Montauk, Freddy circled it as his friends jeered, “Do svidaniya!” — Russian for “goodbye.”

But as he reached his mid-20s, he began drinking heavily. And Donald, then in college, did not approve, haranguing his older brother about wasting his time on frivolous pursuits and telling him to come back to real estate.

“I was too young; I didn’t realize,” he said. “Now I give speeches on success, and I tell people, ‘You’ve got to love what you’re doing.’ ”

Mr. Trump said he had eventually come to recognize that his brother was a talented pilot and belonged in the clouds, not amid bricks and mortar. But by the time Donald had graduated from college in 1968 and had begun ascending at Trump headquarters on Coney Island, Freddy’s drinking was out of control.

Ms. Schifano recalled that the last time she saw Freddy, one night in the late 1960s, he looked gaunt. Even though she prepared his favorite food, roast beef, he barely ate.

The years that followed were unkind. He got divorced, quit flying because he knew his drinking presented a danger and failed at commercial fishing in Florida. By the late 1970s, he was living back in his parents’ house in Jamaica Estates, working on one of his father’s maintenance crews.

By then, Donald had broken into the Manhattan real estate market and the city’s celebrity culture. A younger brother, Robert, had followed in Donald’s footsteps, joining the family company and eventually becoming a top executive there.

In 1977, Donald asked Freddy to be the best man at his first wedding, to the Czech model Ivana Winklmayr, an honor Donald said he hoped would be “a good thing for him.” But the drinking continued, and four years later, Freddy was dead.

Over the next decades, Donald put the Trump name on skyscrapers, casinos and planes.

In 1999, the family patriarch died, and 650 people, including many real estate executives and politicians, crowded his funeral at Marble Collegiate Church on Fifth Avenue.

But the drama was hardly put to rest. Freddy’s son, Fred III, spoke at the funeral, and that night, his wife went into labor with their son, who developed seizures that led to cerebral palsy. The Trump family promised that it would take care of the medical bills.

Then came the unveiling of Fred Sr.’s will, which Donald had helped draft. It divided the bulk of the inheritance, at least $20 million, among his children and their descendants, “other than my son Fred C. Trump Jr.”

Freddy’s children sued, claiming that an earlier version of the will had entitled them to their father’s share of the estate, but that Donald and his siblings had used “undue influence” over their grandfather, who had dementia, to cut them out.

A week later, Mr. Trump retaliated by withdrawing the medical benefits critical to his nephew’s infant child.

“I was angry because they sued,” he explained during last week’s interview. At the time, he attributed their exclusion from the will to his father’s “tremendous dislike” for Freddy’s ex-wife, Linda. She and Fred III declined to comment on the dispute.

Mr. Trump said that the litigation had been settled “very amicably” and that he was fond of Fred III, who works in real estate, though not for the Trump organization. He also said that, at 69, he had grown to appreciate his brother’s free spirit.

“He would have been an amazing peacemaker if he didn’t have the problem, because everybody loved him,” he said. “He’s like the opposite of me.”


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